Category Archives: African languages

Paths to understanding Kpelle

For those interested in learning more about the history and use of the Kpelle language and script, there are a few key resources to be recommended.  One is a dictionary by Theodore Leidenfrost and John S. McKay, Kpelee-woo-Kwii-woo su-kula kɔlɔ,

Paths to understanding Kpelle

For those interested in learning more about the history and use of the Kpelle language and script, there are a few key resources to be recommended.  One is a dictionary by Theodore Leidenfrost and John S. McKay, Kpelee-woo-Kwii-woo su-kula kɔlɔ,

An Ivorian innovation: the Bété script

I write this in memory of Frédéric Bruly Bouabré, who called himself “Cheikh Nadro”, or “he who does not forget”. He was an Ivorian artist who passed away five years ago this month. An exhibition of some of his work

An Ivorian innovation: the Bété script

I write this in memory of Frédéric Bruly Bouabré, who called himself “Cheikh Nadro”, or “he who does not forget”. He was an Ivorian artist who passed away five years ago this month. An exhibition of some of his work

Ah, Foumban…

My memories of visiting Foumban, Cameroon in 2006 are still fairly vivid after a twelve-year absence.  The palace with a statue of a mfon (local king or sultan) on horseback in front stands out, as does touring the museum of

Ah, Foumban…

My memories of visiting Foumban, Cameroon in 2006 are still fairly vivid after a twelve-year absence.  The palace with a statue of a mfon (local king or sultan) on horseback in front stands out, as does touring the museum of

Encoding the Bassa Vah script of Liberia

The tale of how the Bassa Vah script came to be encoded into the Unicode Standard winds through Syracuse, Germany, Liberia, France, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and points between.  It begins in fact long before the birth of Unicode, as early as

Encoding the Bassa Vah script of Liberia

The tale of how the Bassa Vah script came to be encoded into the Unicode Standard winds through Syracuse, Germany, Liberia, France, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and points between.  It begins in fact long before the birth of Unicode, as early as

Notes on the Study of Loma

A script was developed in the 1930’s for the Loma language by Widɔ Zoɓo of Boneketa, Liberia.  While it has gone through a few iterations in the decades since the design of the original syllabary, it has not seen much

Notes on the Study of Loma

A script was developed in the 1930’s for the Loma language by Widɔ Zoɓo of Boneketa, Liberia.  While it has gone through a few iterations in the decades since the design of the original syllabary, it has not seen much