Call for Papers: Digital Orientalisms Twitter Conference 2020 (#DOsTC2020)

Long term readers will likely be aware of The Digital Orientalist’s “Digital Orientalisms Twitter Conference” (DOsTC) which we held on June 1st, 2019. Given the cancellation of many non-virtual conferences this year, the Digital Orientalist has been receiving requests from some of our readers to hold another Twitter Conference. So without further ado, we are happy to announce the call for papers and review pieces for the Digital Orientalisms Twitter Conference 2020 which is scheduled to take place on June 20, 2020.

The Digital Orientalisms Twitter Conference

Inspired by the Public Archaeology Twitter Conference which is organized by Lorna Richardson (@LornaRichardson) and James Dixon (@James_Dixon), we held a small, but successful Twitter Conference last year.  Like last year, we hope that DOsTC2020 will provide a forum in which scholars, educators, students, librarians, and curators engaged in the interface between African, Asian, Latin American, or Middle Eastern studies and the digital humanities can share their research and reviews with each other and non-scholarly audiences. Simultaneously, we hope that the conference may provide a space to reflect upon the digitization of our research and teaching which has been necessitated following the outbreak of COVID-19. A full description of the conference and its theme can be found here.

How will it work?

People interested in presenting can send us proposals here. The deadline for proposals was May 23rd 2020, but has been extended until May 30th.

We are offering speakers two sorts of presentation formats; a paper format and a review format. The paper format allows speakers to share their original research and teaching. The review format will allow scholars to review pieces of software, hardware, books, projects, apps etc. that they have used in their research or teaching and presumably want to recommend (or decry) to others.

For an example of a paper, we recommend looking at the proceedings from last year’s conference or searching for tweets from the Public Archaeology Twitter Conference or PressED Twitter Conference on Twitter. At DOsTC2020 accepted papers will be 12-20 tweets in length and written by making a thread on Twitter. Each tweet should contain the hashtag #DOsTC2020. By including this hashtag, people participating in the conference will be able to find and view presenters’ papers. Presenters are encouraged to use images, videos, maps, timelines or other pieces of media in their tweets. Each presenter will be allocated a 15-20 minute time slot according to their timezone, and each session will be followed by discussion time.

The review format is to the best of our knowledge unique to DOsTC. Reviews will be up to 8 tweets in length written as a thread on Twitter. Like papers, each tweet in a review should contain the hashtag #DOsTC2020. Presenters are encouraged to include images of the item that they are reviewing, so long as it is correctly attributed. Reviews will be placed at the end of each session prior to discussion time.

We hope participants will be understanding if technical issues or other problems are encountered, and that they will enjoy participating in the conference!

In case you missed it earlier in this post, proposals can be made here and full details on the conference can be found here.

Enquiries

Questions should be forwarded to the Digital Orientalist’s Editor-in-Chief, James Morris, either through twitter (@JHMorris89) or email (james@digitalorientalist.com).

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