Category Archives: Digitization

Review: Among Digitized Manuscripts by L.W.C. van Lit (Leiden: Brill, 2020)

For this post, I will be reviewing the new book Among Digitized Manuscripts by C. van Lit (Leiden: Brill, 2020), authored by the founder of this website and the summation of the work he has done on it and since handing over

Review: Among Digitized Manuscripts by L.W.C. van Lit (Leiden: Brill, 2020)

For this post, I will be reviewing the new book Among Digitized Manuscripts by C. van Lit (Leiden: Brill, 2020), authored by the founder of this website and the summation of the work he has done on it and since handing over

Photographing Archival Material at the Cadbury Research Library: Some Reflections

I am indebted to both the Cadbury Research Library at the University of Birmingham and the Church Mission Society for providing me permission to print the images used herein. In the summer of 2019, I spent one month at the

Photographing Archival Material at the Cadbury Research Library: Some Reflections

I am indebted to both the Cadbury Research Library at the University of Birmingham and the Church Mission Society for providing me permission to print the images used herein. In the summer of 2019, I spent one month at the

Among Digitized Manuscripts: A Book

For years, I have explored digitized manuscripts on this website. It left me prepared, three years ago, to embark on a more ambitious investigation into what digitized manuscripts are and what we can do with them. This has now resulted in

Among Digitized Manuscripts: A Book

For years, I have explored digitized manuscripts on this website. It left me prepared, three years ago, to embark on a more ambitious investigation into what digitized manuscripts are and what we can do with them. This has now resulted in

Using Kraken to Train your own OCR Models

This is a contribution by Christine Roughan of NYU. Connect with her on Twitter @cmroughan Over the summer of 2019, inspired by the promising results in articles like Romanov et al. 2017, I set out to use the Kraken OCR software on a variety of texts. Kraken, see their website or their repository, is open-source command line software that is capable

Using Kraken to Train your own OCR Models

This is a contribution by Christine Roughan of NYU. Connect with her on Twitter @cmroughan Over the summer of 2019, inspired by the promising results in articles like Romanov et al. 2017, I set out to use the Kraken OCR software on a variety of texts. Kraken, see their website or their repository, is open-source command line software that is capable

Online Resources for Ancient Mesopotamia?

There has been a big push in recent years to make more academic research and resources openly-available. This is fantastic if you’re a student who, for some reason, finds it difficult to get to your university library (like me!) and

Online Resources for Ancient Mesopotamia?

There has been a big push in recent years to make more academic research and resources openly-available. This is fantastic if you’re a student who, for some reason, finds it difficult to get to your university library (like me!) and

Google Translate with One Click (Mac)

Yes we all know; Google translator is best described as “quick and dirty”. Nonetheless, we all use it because it is very convenient and helpful. Just like the title suggests, this trick will save you the time of copying the

Google Translate with One Click (Mac)

Yes we all know; Google translator is best described as “quick and dirty”. Nonetheless, we all use it because it is very convenient and helpful. Just like the title suggests, this trick will save you the time of copying the

The Importance of Uncertainty: VR Reconstructions of Ancient Buildings

John Sigmier, Ph.D. student at Pennsylvania University, gives us an insight into an ongoing project to display 3D models of Etruscan temples in the Penn University Museum! Though not quite the Ancient Near East, this is a really interesting project

The Importance of Uncertainty: VR Reconstructions of Ancient Buildings

John Sigmier, Ph.D. student at Pennsylvania University, gives us an insight into an ongoing project to display 3D models of Etruscan temples in the Penn University Museum! Though not quite the Ancient Near East, this is a really interesting project