Category Archives: Workflow

Digital Humanities Japan: Building Community and Sharing Resources

This week’s post has been contributed by Paula R. Curtis, Hoyt Long, Molly Des Jardin and Mark Ravina. Information about the authors is included at the end of post. In 2016, “The Impact of the Digital in Japanese Studies” workshop

Digital Humanities Japan: Building Community and Sharing Resources

This week’s post has been contributed by Paula R. Curtis, Hoyt Long, Molly Des Jardin and Mark Ravina. Information about the authors is included at the end of post. In 2016, “The Impact of the Digital in Japanese Studies” workshop

Some Reflections on COVID-19 and the Digitization of Research and Teaching

I have found in my short career as an academic that in spite of its growing popularity there is a certain stigma that surrounds the Digital Humanities and the more general use of digital tools in both research and education.

Some Reflections on COVID-19 and the Digitization of Research and Teaching

I have found in my short career as an academic that in spite of its growing popularity there is a certain stigma that surrounds the Digital Humanities and the more general use of digital tools in both research and education.

ScanTailor: Installation Instructions and Impressions

When we cannot find a digitized version on the internet, we photograph or scan a book or article ourselves. We end up with photos of pages that are warped and rotated, often with a lot of the surrounding showing, saved

ScanTailor: Installation Instructions and Impressions

When we cannot find a digitized version on the internet, we photograph or scan a book or article ourselves. We end up with photos of pages that are warped and rotated, often with a lot of the surrounding showing, saved

Some notes on the usability of the Zotero Reference Manager for Historical Research

This post was written by guest contributor Jasper Bernhofer. Bernhofer received a Bachelor’s Degree in Middle Eastern Studies and Philosophy from Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg and is currently writing his Master’s thesis in Semitic Studies at Freie Universität Berlin. His thesis includes

Some notes on the usability of the Zotero Reference Manager for Historical Research

This post was written by guest contributor Jasper Bernhofer. Bernhofer received a Bachelor’s Degree in Middle Eastern Studies and Philosophy from Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg and is currently writing his Master’s thesis in Semitic Studies at Freie Universität Berlin. His thesis includes

Cursive Japanese and OCR: Using KuroNet

The Center for Open Data in the Humanities’ KuroNet Kuzushiji Ninshiki Sābisu (KuroNetくずし字認識サービス) launched late last year. KuroNet is a free OCR (Optical Character Recognition) platform which allows users to convert images of documents written in cursive Japanese into printed

Cursive Japanese and OCR: Using KuroNet

The Center for Open Data in the Humanities’ KuroNet Kuzushiji Ninshiki Sābisu (KuroNetくずし字認識サービス) launched late last year. KuroNet is a free OCR (Optical Character Recognition) platform which allows users to convert images of documents written in cursive Japanese into printed

Photographing Archival Material at the Cadbury Research Library: Some Reflections

I am indebted to both the Cadbury Research Library at the University of Birmingham and the Church Mission Society for providing me permission to print the images used herein. In the summer of 2019, I spent one month at the

Photographing Archival Material at the Cadbury Research Library: Some Reflections

I am indebted to both the Cadbury Research Library at the University of Birmingham and the Church Mission Society for providing me permission to print the images used herein. In the summer of 2019, I spent one month at the

Using Kraken to Train your own OCR Models

This is a contribution by Christine Roughan of NYU. Connect with her on Twitter @cmroughan Over the summer of 2019, inspired by the promising results in articles like Romanov et al. 2017, I set out to use the Kraken OCR software on a variety of texts. Kraken, see their website or their repository, is open-source command line software that is capable

Using Kraken to Train your own OCR Models

This is a contribution by Christine Roughan of NYU. Connect with her on Twitter @cmroughan Over the summer of 2019, inspired by the promising results in articles like Romanov et al. 2017, I set out to use the Kraken OCR software on a variety of texts. Kraken, see their website or their repository, is open-source command line software that is capable